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Overall rehabilitation and reconstruction needs in the four mainland tsunami-affected states and territories of India are to the tune of US$1.2 billion, according to a Damage and Needs Assessment Report prepared jointly by the World Bank, ADB and United Nations

The assessment report estimated that overall damages to assets are about $575 million and productivity losses about $450 million. The reconstruction estimate is higher than these damages as it will take into account replacement of the damaged assets with new ones not only of equal value, but with upgrades to services and infrastructure in order to reduce the previous inherent vulnerability.

The report assesses the damages and needs both state and sector-wise, and says the largest proportion of damages is concentrated in housing and fisheries, restoring livelihoods, and to some extent in infrastructure and agriculture. Reconstruction needs for housing are estimated at $490 million and fisheries at $285 million.

State-wise, Tamil Nadu is the worst affected with reconstruction needs estimated at $868 million, followed by Kerala ($158 million), Pondicherry ($114 million) and Andhra Pradesh ($73 million).

The sudden and unexpected tsunami has highlighted underlying vulnerabilities to recurrent hazards and the major negative social consequences of such disasters on the livelihoods of the poorest population groups. The negative impact on the livelihoods of the worst affected productive sectors (fisheries and, to a lesser extent, agriculture) spill over to the rest of the community, beyond the actually physically affected areas.

The JAM analysis highlights the cross-cutting nature of the disaster's impact, and thus the multi-sectoral, inter-institutional, and multidisciplinary approach needed for the reconstruction process. The disaster points out the need to undertake cross cutting interventions, with a participatory, equitable, flexible, decentralized, and transparent approach beyond livelihood restoration.

Better management of the coastal environment and reinforced risk reduction should be seen as part of the overall social and economic strategy, resulting in adoption of realistic, attainable goals in the short and medium term. Effective hazard risk management in the future should be less dependent on relief and assistance, which draws valuable resources from other development goals. Instead, there is a need to promote increased participation of the community in risk transfer insurance, community level risk management and disaster prevention, while giving assistance to those affected.


Tsunami unlikely to hurt financials of Indian banks
Associations permitted to accept foreign contribution for Tsunami relief

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Tsunami Relief
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